This day in history: 7/7. In 2005 four cowards committed suicide bomb attacks on London’s transport network that killed 52 people and injured about 700 others. It was the United Kingdom’s worst terrorist incident since the 1988 Lockerbie bombing as well as the country’s first ever suicide attack.At 8:50 am, three bombs were detonated on board London Underground trains within fifty seconds of each other:1- The first exploded on a 6-car London Underground C69 and C77 Stock Circle line sub-surface train, number 204, travelling eastbound between Liverpool Street and Aldgate. 2- The second device exploded in the second car of another 6-car London Underground C69 and C77 Stock Circle line sub-surface train, number 216, which had just left platform 4 at Edgware Road and was travelling westbound toward Paddington. 3- A third bomb was detonated on a 6-car London Underground 1973 Stock Piccadilly line deep-level Underground train, number 311, travelling southbound from King’s Cross-St. Pancras and Russell Square.Almost one hour after the attacks on the London Underground, a fourth bomb was detonated on the top deck of a number 30 double-decker bus. The explosion at 9:47 am in Tavistock Square ripped off the roof and destroyed the rear portion of the bus.The History Bomb does not believe in giving further celebrity to cowards, and as such will not be telling the names of the bastards that committed the attack. Of the four suicide bombers, three were born in Great Britain and one in Jamaica. Three lived in or near Leeds in West Yorkshire; one resided in Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire. Al-Qaida officially claimed responsibility for the attacks on September 1, 2005, in a videotape released to the al-Jazeera television network.Two weeks later, on July 21, 2005, a second set of four bombings was attempted, also targeting the city’s transit system, but failed when the explosives only partially detonated. The four men alleged to be responsible for the failed attacks were arrested in late July.The History Bomb joins our friends across the pond in remembering the lives lost in this senseless act of violence.

This day in history: 7/7. In 2005 four cowards committed suicide bomb attacks on London’s transport network that killed 52 people and injured about 700 others. It was the United Kingdom’s worst terrorist incident since the 1988 Lockerbie bombing as well as the country’s first ever suicide attack.

At 8:50 am, three bombs were detonated on board London Underground trains within fifty seconds of each other:

1- The first exploded on a 6-car London Underground C69 and C77 Stock Circle line sub-surface train, number 204, travelling eastbound between Liverpool Street and Aldgate. 
2- The second device exploded in the second car of another 6-car London Underground C69 and C77 Stock Circle line sub-surface train, number 216, which had just left platform 4 at Edgware Road and was travelling westbound toward Paddington. 
3- A third bomb was detonated on a 6-car London Underground 1973 Stock Piccadilly line deep-level Underground train, number 311, travelling southbound from King’s Cross-St. Pancras and Russell Square.

Almost one hour after the attacks on the London Underground, a fourth bomb was detonated on the top deck of a number 30 double-decker bus. The explosion at 9:47 am in Tavistock Square ripped off the roof and destroyed the rear portion of the bus.

The History Bomb does not believe in giving further celebrity to cowards, and as such will not be telling the names of the bastards that committed the attack. Of the four suicide bombers, three were born in Great Britain and one in Jamaica. Three lived in or near Leeds in West Yorkshire; one resided in Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire. Al-Qaida officially claimed responsibility for the attacks on September 1, 2005, in a videotape released to the al-Jazeera television network.

Two weeks later, on July 21, 2005, a second set of four bombings was attempted, also targeting the city’s transit system, but failed when the explosives only partially detonated. The four men alleged to be responsible for the failed attacks were arrested in late July.

The History Bomb joins our friends across the pond in remembering the lives lost in this senseless act of violence.

This Day in #History: Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer makes his last stand in the Battle of Little Bighorn! Native American forces led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull achieved an overwhelming victory for the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes with five of the twelve companies of American soldiers being completely annihilated.

Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, leaders of the Sioux, had been strongly resisting the efforts of the United States government to confine their people to reservations. After gold was discovered in South Dakota’s Black Hills in 1875, the US Army began actively ignoring treaties with the Native American tribes while invading the region. In anger, many tribesman began leaving their reservations and gathering with Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse in Montana in direct defiance to a US War Department order to return to their reservations. By the summer of 1876 more than 10,000 Native Americans had gathered in a camp alongside the Little Bighorn River.

In mid-June, three columns of US soldiers lined up against the camp in preparation to march. A force of 1,200 Native Americans turned back the first column on 17 June. Five days later, General Alfred Terry ordered Custer’s 7th Cavalry to scout ahead for further Native American forces. On the morning of the 25th, Custer drew near the camp and decided to press on ahead instead of waiting for reinforcements.

Custer’s 600 men entered the Little Bighorn Valley at mid-day – and word quickly spread among the Native Americans. Sitting Bull rallied the warriors and saw to the safety of the women and children while Crazy Horse set off with a large force of as many as 3,000 to meet the 7th Cavalry head on. Custer’s men were quickly overwhelmed. The 7th Cavalry in general suffered a 52 percent casualty rate, while every single soldier in the five companies that Custer had with him were killed. A total of approximately 268 men were killed in the battle, with the Native Americans suffering an estimated casualty rate of half that.

The Battle of Little Bighorn, now known as Custer’s Last Stand (or Lakota Victory Day by the Lakota tribes) marked the most decisive Native American victory over the United States Army in the Plains Indian War. The fate suffered by Custer and his him outraged many white Americans and led to the United States increasing their efforts to subdue the tribes. Within five years, almost all of the Sioux and Cheyenne would be confined to reservations.

This Day in #History: Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer makes his last stand in the Battle of Little Bighorn! Native American forces led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull achieved an overwhelming victory for the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes with five of the twelve companies of American soldiers being completely annihilated.

Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, leaders of the Sioux, had been strongly resisting the efforts of the United States government to confine their people to reservations. After gold was discovered in South Dakota’s Black Hills in 1875, the US Army began actively ignoring treaties with the Native American tribes while invading the region. In anger, many tribesman began leaving their reservations and gathering with Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse in Montana in direct defiance to a US War Department order to return to their reservations. By the summer of 1876 more than 10,000 Native Americans had gathered in a camp alongside the Little Bighorn River.

In mid-June, three columns of US soldiers lined up against the camp in preparation to march. A force of 1,200 Native Americans turned back the first column on 17 June. Five days later, General Alfred Terry ordered Custer’s 7th Cavalry to scout ahead for further Native American forces. On the morning of the 25th, Custer drew near the camp and decided to press on ahead instead of waiting for reinforcements.

Custer’s 600 men entered the Little Bighorn Valley at mid-day – and word quickly spread among the Native Americans. Sitting Bull rallied the warriors and saw to the safety of the women and children while Crazy Horse set off with a large force of as many as 3,000 to meet the 7th Cavalry head on. Custer’s men were quickly overwhelmed. The 7th Cavalry in general suffered a 52 percent casualty rate, while every single soldier in the five companies that Custer had with him were killed. A total of approximately 268 men were killed in the battle, with the Native Americans suffering an estimated casualty rate of half that.

The Battle of Little Bighorn, now known as Custer’s Last Stand (or Lakota Victory Day by the Lakota tribes) marked the most decisive Native American victory over the United States Army in the Plains Indian War. The fate suffered by Custer and his him outraged many white Americans and led to the United States increasing their efforts to subdue the tribes. Within five years, almost all of the Sioux and Cheyenne would be confined to reservations.

"As early as 1096, teaching had already started in Oxford. By 1249, the University of Oxford had grown into a full-fledged university, replete with student housing at the school’s three original “halls of residence”—University, Balliol and Merton Colleges…But the origination of the Aztec civilization, marked by the founding of the city of Tenochtitlán by the Mexica at Lake Texcoco, didn’t come until 1325. Tenochtitlán was captured by Spanish conquerors in 1521, just 196 years later."http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/oxford-university-is-older-than-the-aztecs-1529607/?no-ist

"As early as 1096, teaching had already started in Oxford. By 1249, the University of Oxford had grown into a full-fledged university, replete with student housing at the school’s three original “halls of residence”—University, Balliol and Merton Colleges…But the origination of the Aztec civilization, marked by the founding of the city of Tenochtitlán by the Mexica at Lake Texcoco, didn’t come until 1325. Tenochtitlán was captured by Spanish conquerors in 1521, just 196 years later."

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/oxford-university-is-older-than-the-aztecs-1529607/?no-ist

The History Bomb Explains: The Committee of Five

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_Mf9FqP8BE

On June 11, 1776 the Continental Congress selects Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, John Adams of Massachusetts, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania, Roger Sherman of Connecticut and Robert R. Livingston of New York to draft a declaration of independence. It operated from June 11, 1776 until July 5, 1776 when the Declaration was published.

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Sources Include:

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration_history.html

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration_timeline.html

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/congress-appoints-committee-of-five-to-draft-the-declaration-of-independence

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/declara/declara4.html

Friends, noblemen, those who can’t believe how beautiful the Red Bull Ring looks: IT’S A NEW EPISODE OF THE HISTORY BOMB PODCAST!!!This week: ‘Lust for Life - Dr. David Herzberg and Prescription Drug Abuse’Heroin to housewives. Cocaine to children. Wasn’t drug abuse just a problem just for the unwashed masses of immigrants? Well, no, actually. In fact, for the longest time prescription drug abuse wasn’t even acknowledged as a problem. It’s always been around in some form, and the history is as complicated as and nuanced as any ancient battle. From the immigrants at the docks, to the ladies of high society, join the History Bomb as we discuss prescription drug abuse in America!We are joined this week by Dr. David Herzberg, Professor of History at the University at Buffalo and author of ‘Happy Pills in America: From Miltown to Prozac’ (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009). Listen:iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-history-bomb/id841405209Webplayer: http://thehistorybomb.tumblr.com/webplayerStitcher Radio: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-history-bomb?refid=stprYou can buy Dr. Herzberg’s book here:http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0801898145/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0801898145&linkCode=as2&tag=thehisbom-20&linkId=ZHTHT3VWZRUZXDC3

Friends, noblemen, those who can’t believe how beautiful the Red Bull Ring looks: IT’S A NEW EPISODE OF THE HISTORY BOMB PODCAST!!!

This week: ‘Lust for Life - Dr. David Herzberg and Prescription Drug Abuse’

Heroin to housewives. Cocaine to children. Wasn’t drug abuse just a problem just for the unwashed masses of immigrants? Well, no, actually. In fact, for the longest time prescription drug abuse wasn’t even acknowledged as a problem. It’s always been around in some form, and the history is as complicated as and nuanced as any ancient battle. From the immigrants at the docks, to the ladies of high society, join the History Bomb as we discuss prescription drug abuse in America!

We are joined this week by Dr. David Herzberg, Professor of History at the University at Buffalo and author of ‘Happy Pills in America: From Miltown to Prozac’ (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009). 

Listen:
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-history-bomb/id841405209
Webplayer: http://thehistorybomb.tumblr.com/webplayer
Stitcher Radio: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-history-bomb?refid=stpr

You can buy Dr. Herzberg’s book here:http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0801898145/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0801898145&linkCode=as2&tag=thehisbom-20&linkId=ZHTHT3VWZRUZXDC3

Oddly enough I came across this while researching something completely different. I sort of want to go to this bar.

Oddly enough I came across this while researching something completely different. I sort of want to go to this bar.